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Using the Airbnb Style Guild, Setting Up GitHub Issues for a new Project, Working by the Beach

As you know, I’m only supposed to be working on this project on the weekends.  During the week, I’ll give myself an hour to do some smaller tasks if they come up, or if I feel like I need to make a small change to existing code. Typically, Saturday is my “marathon” coding day.  I use the term marathon because I’m working typically 6 to 8 hours; nothing too intense.  This means that Fridays are a great opportunity for me to unwind from a long work week, and prep my tasks for Saturday. Youn can listen here: Itunes: http://bit.ly/ReactRails  Bumpers: https://bumpers.fm/u/LaToya      I decided to start implementing the AirBnB Style Guide and set up GitHub Issues.  I’m relocating to an Airbnb by the beach (I’m in Downtown Porto, Portugal now), so I’m hoping to find a nice cafe near the beach I can work from while I sip espresso, and nibble…

Coding Challenge: Do a 5 Day Deep Dive Into a Project You Want to Make Progress On

There are plenty of coding challenges floating around the internet.  But, a lot of them are in spaces that feel highly academic (I dropped out of college twice) or are based on competition.  I wanted to participate in a coding challenge that was based on completing a project, watching other people complete projects, and celebrating the fact that we’re all making progress at the same time.  I find it really interesting to see how people approach problems, and what they learn from “failures”. I also knew that I didn’t want to commit to a long-term coding challenge. I write code for a living, so I’m already putting in at least 8 hours per day.  I know myself well enough to know that if I committed to a long-term coding challenge, my self-care wouldn’t be a priority.  And to be perfectly honest with you, when my self-care isn’t a priority, my…

I’m Starting a Mentorship Program for Underrepresented People in Tech

Update: Applications are open! Details on how to apply here. I remember when I made the decision to quit my bartending job and focus on writing code full time. It was 4 am, and I was standing behind the front bar of a busy Wicker Park club, wearing a blue wig.  The theme of the party I was bartending was “Fight or Flight”, so I was dressed like Brittany Spears from the toxic video.  The dance floor was packed with people dressed like pilots, flight attendants, boxers, and ninjas. I felt like I understood some basics of Ruby, Python, and other languages that I’d been teaching myself, but something was missing. I didn’t know how to put it all together to write code like a professional would. I turned around to my friend Shaun who was a software engineer and told him my plan.  To celebrate, he bought a round of shots for everyone…

35 Projects You Can Add to GitHub to Show Off Your Dev Skills

I first discovered GitHub when I was going to MeetUps in the Loop, trying to figure out what a “real” developer did. As someone who came from a non-technical background, I wanted to know as much about getting into the tech industry as I could.  I kept hearing from professional developers that companies would see their work on GitHub, and reach out to them with job opportunities. As someone without a college degree who disliked putting together resumes, I thought “This is for me.” I figured if I added projects to my GitHub, I could find a job as a “real” developer. I think it worked 🙂 It’s no secret that hiring managers, recruiters, and developers look to GitHub when looking for talent. It’s a way for them to look at your work, and see how you might fit on their team. Many companies are getting rid of resumes altogether…