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Using Angular and Azure to show Programming Language Trends

Building the Prototype I imagined it being a web app, so my first challenge was a technical one: (re)learning the necessary tools for web development. I chose to learn Angular and struggle with the Plotly JS documentation in order to make the front end. As for the backend, I had to get reacquainted with ASP.NET and Azure, after a break of a few years. But the more interesting challenge came from a design and data visualization perspective. As opposed to other tools with higher data density that also caused more noise when displaying it, I made a conscious decision to have minimal (read clear and uncluttered) presentation that would offer a fast answer, even though it meant showing less data. The Result 🎉 Without any further ado, here’s the result – already live at langstats.azurewebsites.net. Go see it and return! Tech Stack Going a bit into the technical details, the prototype…

I’m Hosting a Demo Day for WiT

Inspired by our Slack’s #victory channel and #WiTBragDay, we’re organizing a remote DEMO DAY end of this month! On August 31st 4:00 pm – 4:45 pm EST, practice bragging about your project alongside a supportable community. Sign up is first come first serve in #demos or DM me with your topic @herlifeinpixels. We’re aiming for at least 5 demos. Anyone is welcome to join in to listen and offer feedback. Shoot me your email for an invite to Google Hangouts. WHY IT’S IMPORTANT TO TALK ABOUT OUR WORK & PROCESSES In an ideal world, the quality of a person’s work could speak for itself, but this isn’t the case for underrepresented folks whose experiences are often overlooked and underestimated. One way to show the industry our value is by getting good at framing what we do and being proactive at giving ourselves credit. For a long time in my career, I’ve struggled with talking…

Building A Twitter Bot in Python

My first encounter with Twitter bots happened last year via Python and involved my building a bot that would receive tweets with a specific hashtag and photo attached, apply an instagram-like filter to it, and retweet the user with the new photo. It was a fun first pass at getting my hands dirty with Twitter’s streaming API (which of all it’s API’s might actually be the least obvious one to use… I thought I was struggling because #n00b, etc. but a number of more experienced coders have since reassured me that it’s not just me. Wee!) For my second pass at bot-building things went a little differently. Firstly, when it came to deciding on the botiness of the bot itself, I opted for language processing over image processing. This was for no other reason than I’ve been looking for an excuse to build something with ELIZA, one of the earliest known natural…